Which trimming method is best?

By Steve Mason on

Gerard Cramer’s research group recently surveyed published research studies that examined the effects of hoof trimming on animal behaviour, physiologic changes and efficacy in reducing lameness. Although these studies revealed that hoof trimming may initiate a stress response, change behaviour, improve components of weight bearing, and reduce lameness in specific environmental conditions, few of the studies described the trimming method used in enough detail to determine effects of method on any of these outcomes.

Zinpro’s new Cattle Lameness book

By Steve Mason on

Zinpro has recently released a new book and app dealing with beef and dairy cattle hoof health. ‘Cattle Lameness: Identification, Prevention and Control of Claw Lesions’ is a Zinpro-led industry effort to assist cattle producers in improving animal wellness through the prevention of lameness.

Is 3 inch dorsal claw length too short?

By Steve Mason on

Current recommendations for the length of the dorsal hoof wall after trimming range from 60 to 85 mm; the most common recommendation being 75 mm. A British research study that examined internal claw structure using x-ray computed tomography (CT scan) suggests that the minimum external dorsal claw length recommendation should be increased to at least 90 mm for Holstein-Friesian cows over 4 years of age and at least 85 mm for younger cows.

Ultrasound measurement of digital cushion depth

Digital Cushion Depth Affects Susceptibility to Claw Horn Lesions

By Steve Mason on

A study by researchers at Cornell University examined the association between claw horn lesions and the thickness of the digital cushion. Results suggest that thin digital cushions, related to low body condition score, may be a factor in the development of sole ulcers and white line lesions.