How to Detect DD in Pregnant Heifers

By Steve Mason on

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin reported that heifers with pre-partum digital dermatitis (DD) had lower milk production, poorer conception to first service, longer days open and were more likely to have multiple cases of DD. Those researchers recommended that a DD control program should be a priority for pregnant heifers. But before a control program can be implemented, a reliable method of detecting DD in these animals is required. At the 2016 Western Canadian Dairy Seminar, University of Calgary graduate student Casey Jacobs described how she used ‘pen walks’ to detect DD in pre-calf heifers.

Non-healing white line disease on the lateral claw of a right hindlimb before treatment.

How to treat non-healing claw lesions

By Steve Mason on

Non-healing (nh) bovine hoof horn lesions, characterized by penetration of the horn capsule and association with white line disease (nhWLD) and sole ulcers (nhSU) are frequently encountered in dairy herds endemically affected by digital dermatitis (DD). Lesions of this type are associated with more severe lameness, often leading to claw amputation or slaughter and they respond poorly to standard DD treatment. Researchers in Austria recently described a successful therapy for such lesions.

DD Treatments That Work

By Steve Mason on

Few claims about the efficacy of products used to treat digital dermatitis (DD) are supported by any conclusive scientific evidence. Not all treatment trials provide conclusive evidence – many reported trials are poorly designed, leading to bias towards a particular outcome.
A recent study considered a large number of DD treatment trials, eliminating all but four that were rigorously designed to give conclusive, unbiased results.

Multiple Bacterial Species Are Involved in DD Lesions

By Steve Mason on

Previous studies have demonstrated that multiple bacterial species are associated with digital dermatitis (DD) lesions, with spirochetes being the most commonly identified organism. A recent study at Iowa State University demonstrated that, although spirochetes are the predominant bacteria present in the later stages of lesion development, many other bacterial species are involved in the earlier stages.