A 5-point plan for DD Control

By Steve Mason on

A comprehensive strategy for the control of digital dermatitis (DD) in dairy herds was presented at the 2016 UK Cattle Lameness Conference. The 5-point plan, which applies to young stock as well as dry and lactating cows, includes:
1. External biosecurity to keep disease out of farm
2. Internal biosecurity to minimise infection pressure on cows
3. Early identification, recording and treatment of clinical cases, in
association with hoof care
4. Frequent foot disinfection to reduce new cases
5. Defining and monitoring hoof health targets

Trimming Strategy Affects Hoof Lesion Prevalence

By Steve Mason on

To examine the influence of their hoof trimming strategies on hoof health, herds participating in phase 1 of the Alberta Dairy Hoof Health Project were classified according to whether they did whole-herd or partial-herd trims. On farms with partial-herd trims, prevalences of the most common lesions were higher than on farms with whole-herd trims.

Digital dermatitis lesions are easy to detect in the milking parlour

DD Detection in the Milking Parlour

By Steve Mason on

To control digital dermatitis (DD), M2-stage lesions need to be treated as soon as possible after they are detected. Waiting more than a few days for the next time the trimmer is scheduled to visit will never get DD under control. Several studies have examined the accuracy of DD detection in the milking parlour compared with lifting feet in a trim chute. Results suggest that inspection of heels in the parlour using a simple mirror and headlamp is a viable option for routinely monitoring DD lesions.

How to Detect DD in Pregnant Heifers

By Steve Mason on

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin reported that heifers with pre-partum digital dermatitis (DD) had lower milk production, poorer conception to first service, longer days open and were more likely to have multiple cases of DD. Those researchers recommended that a DD control program should be a priority for pregnant heifers. But before a control program can be implemented, a reliable method of detecting DD in these animals is required. At the 2016 Western Canadian Dairy Seminar, University of Calgary graduate student Casey Jacobs described how she used ‘pen walks’ to detect DD in pre-calf heifers.

Zinpro’s new Cattle Lameness book

By Steve Mason on

Zinpro has recently released a new book and app dealing with beef and dairy cattle hoof health. ‘Cattle Lameness: Identification, Prevention and Control of Claw Lesions’ is a Zinpro-led industry effort to assist cattle producers in improving animal wellness through the prevention of lameness.

Is 3 inch dorsal claw length too short?

By Steve Mason on

Current recommendations for the length of the dorsal hoof wall after trimming range from 60 to 85 mm; the most common recommendation being 75 mm. A British research study that examined internal claw structure using x-ray computed tomography (CT scan) suggests that the minimum external dorsal claw length recommendation should be increased to at least 90 mm for Holstein-Friesian cows over 4 years of age and at least 85 mm for younger cows.

Hoof-Health-Genetics

Can breeding improve hoof health?

By Steve Mason on

Although housing and management practices play a dominant role in dairy cattle hoof health, genetics can influence the incidence and severity of lesions. A preliminary analysis of hoof lesion data collected in 3 Canadian provinces suggests that it may be possible to use this type of data in genetic selection. A project is currently underway to investigate the possibility of incorporating data collected electronically by hoof trimmers into the Canadian national DHI database. This would facilitate the collection of the large quantities of data required to accurately calculate breeding values for hoof health traits.